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Questions SOCI

Fundamentals of Informatics

  1. Complexity of algorithms and problems. A class of practically solvable problems. The meaning of NP-completeness.
    IB110
  2. Turing machines and Church-Turing theses. The concept of an undecidable and partially resolvable problem.
    IB110
  3. Automata and formal grammars as a tool for recognizing and generating languages.
    IB110
  4. Programming languages: basic characteristics (compiled, interpreted, imperative, object, functional); differences between different types of languages; examples of programming languages; basic principles of object-oriented programming.
    IB111
  5. Programming in imperative language: basic control structures (conditions, cycles), functions, recursion; basic data types; basic data structures (queue, stack, tree, ...). Specify in the context of the selected programming language.
    IB111, IB002
  6. Classical algorithms: Euclidean algorithm, binary search, sorting algorithms, chart scan to width and depth, chart sketch.
    IB111, IB002
  7. Relative model: relational scheme, schema keys, integrity constraints. Fundamentals of indexing and hash; B + trees.
    PB168
  8. SQL: syntax and command semantics; commands for querying and updating data; aggregation function; linking sessions; commands for data definition. Transaction processing: transaction definition, properties.
    PB168
  9. Fundamentals of SW and data modeling: DFD creation, principles of structured analysis, UML diagrams (usage diagram, class diagram, sequence diagram), design of data structures, ER diagrams (entities, attributes, relationships), graphical representation, ERD transfer to relational model.
    PB168
  10. Operating systems: architectures, operating system interfaces. File system: basic functions, the principle of running the selected file system; principles of file access control. Memory Management: Logical and Physical Address Space; pagination; virtualization.
    PB002, PB169
  11. Scheduling in operating systems: processor management and planning; administration and planning of I / O equipment; processes and threads, process synchronization, jams, and mismatch methods.
    PB002, PB169
  12. Computer networks: ISO / OSI model, principle of single layer function, their protocols with emphasis on application layer protocols, network elements. Fundamentals of security in computer networks: firewall; data authentication, computers and users.
    PB002, PB169
  13. Computer networks: connected and unbundled networks, differences and examples. IP networks: architecture; IPv4 and IPv6 network and transport protocols, their properties; addressing and basic routing mechanisms.
    PB002
  14. Fundamentals of Computational Systems: von Neuman's computer diagram, its components and the principle of functioning. Numerical systems: relationships between numerical systems; display numbers on your computer; displaying a real number.
    PB002
  15. Multimedia applications: analogue to digital conversion; principles of compression; audio and video transmission problems on networks. P2P networks: their principles and features; differences over client-server architecture. Wireless networks: the ad-hoc network principle; sensor networks and their applications.
    PB002, PB169

Sociology

  1. Introduction to sociology: continuity and change, modernity and postmodernity; sociology and critical thinking (theory and practice, relativism and absolutism); sociology and research (subject and subject, facts and values); sociology and theory (idealism and materialism, structure and action); risk society (late modern, risk distribution, knowledge in risk society); social inequality, coexistence and family; individualisation and standardization of life stories; reflexive modernization (knowledge and science, technology and policy options); sociology as a form of knowledge (Mills, Berger, Weber); man and society (Todorov, Goffman, Merton); the structure of power (Foucault, Bourdieu); social change (Merton, Simmel).
  2. General Sociological Theory: Macro and Microsociology (Everyday and Social Interaction); society as an objective reality; society as a subjective reality; structure and behavior (habitus and social field, dominance and symbolic power, logic of social action); the institutional structures of modernity (institutional differentiation, rationalization and discipline); modernity and crisis (the crisis of legitimacy, reflexive modernization).
  3. Classical Sociological Theories: Triumphant Modernity (Comte, Spencer, Tönnies); democratic modernity (de Tocqueville); capitalist modernity (Marx); modernity individualized (Durkheim); modernity rationalized (Weber); ambivalent modernity (Simmel); modernity irrational (Pareto, Michels, LeBon, Tarde, Freud); modernity criticized (Veblen, Mead, Chicago School, Mannheim, Elias).
  4. Methodology of social sciences: science and its structure; social and natural sciences; paradigm; the multiparadigmatic nature of the social sciences; deductive and inductive way of scientific thinking; research design; hypotheses and the rules of their verification; operationalization and measurement in the social sciences; research unit and set; sample surveys; types of variables.
  5. Sociological research methods: sophisticated questionnaire (measurement of attitudes, meanings and value preferences, scale of postmaterialism, range of opinion leadership, Schwartz value portraits, how to measure the social class, measuring the prestige of the profession, ISCO, SIOPS, ISEI, measurement of political orientation, social capital, sociometry , semantic differential, return on sample surveys); the basics of qualitative research; non-observable techniques of sociological research (document analysis, content analysis, statistics); secondary analysis; international comparative research; sociological research and Internet resources; evaluating research; ethics and social research policy; examining the individual case.
  6. Social Informatics: Communication as Social Interaction; language; methods and objectives of computer language and speech processing in the social context; dialogue as social interaction, dialog systems, Affective Computing; assistive technology; company structure, conflicts, computer simulation of company behavior and development; computer simulation and modeling of co-operation and social development.
  7. Information Society: Computer Revolution; the paradox of productivity; Internet and WWW; digital economy; network economy and virtual companies; organizational and enterprise structures; organizational changes; telecommunications and information infrastructure; legal aspects of the information society; ethical problems; the use of computing techniques; social impacts.
  8. Speech interaction: speech communication and its social meaning; SSML - basics of syntax and usage areas; speech synthesis, speech recognition - basic principles; human-human-human dialogue - computer, social aspects of dialog systems; W3C VoiceBrowser Activity - defined standards. Social networks: basic principles of social networks; types of social networks.